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"President" John Adams, Jr

"President" John Adams, Jr[1, 2, 3]

Male 1735 - 1826  (90 years)

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  • Name John Adams 
    Title "President" 
    Suffix Jr 
    Born 19 Oct 1735  Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Occupation 1797 - 1801  The White House, Washington, District of Columbia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    President of the United States 
    Presidential Seal
    Presidential Seal
    Presidential Seal
    (Indicates this person was a President of the United States)
    Residence 1797 - 1801  The White House, Washington, District of Columbia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    The White House
    The White House
    The White House, Washington D.C.
    On Saturday, November 1, 1800, John Adams became the first president to take residence in the building.[13] During Adams' second day in the house, he wrote a letter to his wife Abigail, containing a prayer for the house. Adams wrote:

    I pray Heaven to bestow the best of blessings on this House, and all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but honest and wise men ever rule under this roof.
    Buried Jul 1826 
    Died 4 Jul 1826  Quincy, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I4268  MRP Tree
    Last Modified 30 Sep 2014 

    Father John Adams,   b. 28 Jan 1691, Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 May 1770, Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Mother Susannah Boylston,   b. 5 Mar 1699, Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Apr 1797, Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 98 years) 
    Married 31 Oct 1734  Brookline, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F1810  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Abigail Smith,   b. 11 Nov 1744, Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Oct 1818, Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Married 25 Oct 1764  Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Abigail Amelia "Nabby" Adams,   b. 14 Jul 1765, Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Aug 1813, Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years)
    +2. John Quincy Adams,   b. 11 Jul 1767, Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Feb 1848, Washington, District of Columbia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     3. Susanna Boylston Adams,   b. 1768, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1770, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
     4. Charles Adams,   b. 29 Sep 1770, Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Nov 1800, New York, New York, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 30 years)
     5. Thomas Boylston Adams,   b. 1772, Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1832, Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years)
    Last Modified 29 Sep 2014 13:36:38 
    Family ID F1809  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 19 Oct 1735 - Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 25 Oct 1764 - Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - President of the United States - 1797 - 1801 - The White House, Washington, District of Columbia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1797 - 1801 - The White House, Washington, District of Columbia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 4 Jul 1826 - Quincy, Suffolk, Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    adams-john-1735-1826.jpg
    adams-john-1735-1826.jpg
    John Adams, 2nd President
    President John Adams
    President John Adams
    John Adams

    Learned and thoughtful, John Adams was more remarkable as a political philosopher than as a politician. "People and nations are forged in the fires of adversity," he said, doubtless thinking of his own as well as the American experience.

    Adams was born in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1735. A Harvard-educated lawyer, he early became identified with the patriot cause; a delegate to the First and Second Continental Congresses, he led in the movement for independence.

    During the Revolutionary War he served in France and Holland in diplomatic roles, and helped negotiate the treaty of peace. From 1785 to 1788 he was minister to the Court of St. James's, returning to be elected Vice President under George Washington.

    Adams' two terms as Vice President were frustrating experiences for a man of his vigor, intellect, and vanity. He complained to his wife Abigail, "My country has in its wisdom contrived for me the most insignificant office that ever the invention of man contrived or his imagination conceived."

    When Adams became President, the war between the French and British was causing great difficulties for the United States on the high seas and intense partisanship among contending factions within the Nation.

    His administration focused on France, where the Directory, the ruling group, had refused to receive the American envoy and had suspended commercial relations.

    Adams sent three commissioners to France, but in the spring of 1798 word arrived that the French Foreign Minister Talleyrand and the Directory had refused to negotiate with them unless they would first pay a substantial bribe. Adams reported the insult to Congress, and the Senate printed the correspondence, in which the Frenchmen were referred to only as "X, Y, and Z."

    The Nation broke out into what Jefferson called "the X. Y. Z. fever," increased in intensity by Adams's exhortations. The populace cheered itself hoarse wherever the President appeared. Never had the Federalists been so popular.

    Congress appropriated money to complete three new frigates and to build additional ships, and authorized the raising of a provisional army. It also passed the Alien and Sedition Acts, intended to frighten foreign agents out of the country and to stifle the attacks of Republican editors.

    President Adams did not call for a declaration of war, but hostilities began at sea. At first, American shipping was almost defenseless against French privateers, but by 1800 armed merchantmen and U.S. warships were clearing the sea-lanes.

    Despite several brilliant naval victories, war fever subsided. Word came to Adams that France also had no stomach for war and would receive an envoy with respect. Long negotiations ended the quasi war.

    Sending a peace mission to France brought the full fury of the Hamiltonians against Adams. In the campaign of 1800 the Republicans were united and effective, the Federalists badly divided. Nevertheless, Adams polled only a few less electoral votes than Jefferson, who became President.

    On November 1, 1800, just before the election, Adams arrived in the new Capital City to take up his residence in the White House. On his second evening in its damp, unfinished rooms, he wrote his wife, "Before I end my letter, I pray Heaven to bestow the best of Blessings on this House and all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but honest and wise Men ever rule under this roof."

    Adams retired to his farm in Quincy. Here he penned his elaborate letters to Thomas Jefferson. Here on July 4, 1826, he whispered his last words: "Thomas Jefferson survives." But Jefferson had died at Monticello a few hours earlier.

    The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from The Presidents of the United States of America, by Frank Freidel and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association.
    http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/johnadams

  • Sources 
    1. [S355] Connecticut, Deaths and Burials Index, 1650-1934.
      Birth date: abt 1735 Birth place: Death date: 4 Jul 1826 Death place: Connecticut
      http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=fsconnecticutdeath&h=1686306&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

    2. [S41] Great Migration Begins, Immigrants to New England, 1620-33, Robert Charles Anderson.
      ORIGIN: Unknown MIGRATION: 1621 on Fortune FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth FREEMAN: In "1633" Plymouth list of freemen, John Adams appears ahead of those persons admitted on 1 January 1632/3 [PCR 1:3]. ESTATE: In the 1623 Plymouth land division John Adams was granted one acre, as a passenger on the Fortune [PCR 12:5]. In the 1627 Plymouth cattle division John Adams, "Eliner Adams," and James Adams were the second, third and fourth persons in the sixth company [PCR 12:11]. With four others, John Adams was on 1 July 1633 assigned to mow where Mr. Gilson had mowed the year before [PCR 1:14]. John Adams was assessed 9s. in the tax list of 25 March 1633, and "Widow Adams" was assessed the same amount on 27 March4 [PCR 1:10, 28]. On 24 October 1633 John Winslow and John Jenny took an inventory of the goods of John Adams; the total was £71 14s., of which £37 10s. was in neat cattle [MD 1:157-58]. The inventory was presented at court on 11 November 1633, and the widowlen Adams was named adminstratrix, the deceased having left no will; she was bound in the sum of £140, John Barnes surety, to provide £5 apiece to her three children by John Adams - James, John and Susan - when they came of age, if she should choose to remarry [PCR 1:19]. The payment to son James, made by Kenelm Winslow, was recorded on 26 December 1651 [PCR 2:176]. DEATH: Between 1 July 1633 (assignment of mowing ground) and 24 October 1633 (date of inventory). MARRIAGE: About 1625 ELLEN NEWTON (this identification, long in print, is based on the fact that she is the only Ellen in the 1623 land division, and there was no other known addition to the Plymouth population in the next few years); she married second in June 1634 KENELM WINSLOW [PCR 1:30], and was buried at Marshfield 5 December 1681 "being 83 years old" (probably an inflated age) [MarVR 13]. CHILDREN: i JAMES, b. before 22 May 1627; m. Scituate 15 or 16 June or 16 July 1646 Frances Vassall, daughter of WILLIAM VASSALL [ScVR 2:11; PCR 2:108; 8:19]. ii JOHN, b. after 22 May 1627; m. (1) Marshfield 27 December 1654 Jane James [MarVR 1]; m. (2) by 10 December 1666 Elizabeth _____ [TAG 55:214]. iii SUSAN, b. after 22 May 1627; no further record. COMMENTS: The best treatment in print of John Adams and his two sons is Robert S. Wakefield, "Men of the Fortune: John Adams," TAG 55 (1979):212-14. (An earlier account is in NEHGR 33 [1879]:410-13.) Banks has published some records for the name John Adams in London, but none of these can be connected with John Adams of Plymouth [Pilgrim Fathers 105].

    3. [S9] Family Trees and LDS, This information is obtained from Public and Private Family Trees and Data Collections including but not limited to: LDS, Ancestry, WFT, MyFamily etc., (Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual private or public files. This infomation is not a "Primary Source".), Ancestry Family Trees.
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=22755840&pid=4268


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