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"President" Franklin "Frank" Pierce

"President" Franklin "Frank" Pierce[1, 2]

Male 1804 - 1869  (64 years)

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  • Name Franklin "Frank" Pierce 
    Title "President" 
    Born 23 Nov 1804  Hillsboro, Hillsborough, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Gender Male 
    Occupation 1853 - 1857  The White House, Washington, District of Columbia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    President of the United States 
    Presidential Seal
    Presidential Seal
    Presidential Seal
    (Indicates this person was a President of the United States)
    Residence 1853 - 1857  The White House, Washington, District of Columbia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    The White House
    The White House
    The White House, Washington D.C.
    On Saturday, November 1, 1800, John Adams became the first president to take residence in the building.[13] During Adams' second day in the house, he wrote a letter to his wife Abigail, containing a prayer for the house. Adams wrote:

    I pray Heaven to bestow the best of blessings on this House, and all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but honest and wise men ever rule under this roof.
    Residence 1860  Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    1860 U.S. Federal Census
    1860 U.S. Federal Census
    Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Concord Ward 5, Merrimack, New Hampshire; Roll: M653_675; Page: 859; Image: 191; Family History Library Film: 803675.
    The Pierce Manse
    The Pierce Manse
    The Pierce Manse, located in Concord, New Hampshire, was the home of the 14th President of the United States, Franklin Pierce
    Died 8 Oct 1869  Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    • Cause of death: Chronic inflammation of the stomach attended with dropsical efficiency of the abdomen
    Buried Old North Cemetery, Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Pierce Family Plot
    Pierce Family Plot
    Pierce Family Plot -
    Franklin Pierce (1804 - 1869)
    Jane M. Appleton Pierce (1806 - 1863)
    Franklin Pierce (1836 - 1836)
    Frank Robert Pierce (1839 - 1843)
    Benjamin Pierce (1841 - 1853)
    Plot: Minot enclosure adjoining Old North Cemetery
    Pierce Family Plot
    Pierce Family Plot
    Pierce Family Plot -
    Franklin Pierce (1804 - 1869)
    Jane M. Appleton Pierce (1806 - 1863)
    Franklin Pierce (1836 - 1836)
    Frank Robert Pierce (1839 - 1843)
    Benjamin Pierce (1841 - 1853)
    Franklin Pierce Historical Marker
    Franklin Pierce Historical Marker
    Franklin Pierce, 14th President - Historical Marker
    Pierce, Franklin
    Pierce, Franklin
    Franklin Pierce, 14th President
    Notes 
    • 14th United States President. He was born in Hillsborugh, New Hampshire, to a father who served in the Revolutionary War and became its governor. Franklin Pierce's early education was at the Hancock and Francistown Academy then graduating from Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine. After graduation, he studied law under a local judge, spent two years in Law School at North Hampton, Mass, admitted to the Bar and began practice in his native town of Hillsbourgh. In a chance meeting, he met Jane Appleton, the daughter of the former President of Bowdoin College which became a tragic marriage. She was a religious eccentric who blamed all events on the wrath of god brought on my her husbands political life. Their first son died on the third day of birth and the second born three years later died of typhus and the third was killed at the age of eleven in a tragic train derailment when Franklin Pierce was the President-elect. During his one term in office, he made no cabinet changes and expressed little or no interest in the presidency. However, his administration had some achievements: A dispute involving the boundary between the United States and Mexico was settled creating the Territory of Arizona. A serious fishery question with Great Britain off the coast of Newfoundland was settled by mutual and peaceful concessions. At the termination of his term, his wife was slowly dying from tuberculosis. Pierce took her to the Caribbean and the Mediterranean for treatment. Jane Pierce was in deep depression and merely trudged about weeping while clutching her son's bible and a box with locks of hair from all three of her lost children. Life for President Pierce became even worst. He spent most of the pre-Civil war years in Europe then returned to his residence in Concord. Probably the only good occurred when his wife mercifully died and was buried beside her two sons in the Old North Cemetery in Concord. He then became as reclusive as his wife had been. The Presidents health began to decline aided by his heavy use of alcohol dying of cirrhosis of the liver at the age of 64. He lay in state in Doric Hall in Concord followed by a funeral at St. Paul's Episcopal Church and was buried beside his wife and children. Even though after his death he was virtually forgotten, His legacy shines in New England: The Pierce homestead in Hillsborough was constructed by his father the year Franklin was born. Here Daniel Webster was entertained and in the ballroom on the second floor, Franklin Pierce drilled local militia groups. The mansion is maintained and operated by the Hillsborough Historical Society. The Pierce Manse, Concord was originally located at 14 Penacock Street and was the only house ever owned and occupied by the Pierces with their two children. Threatened with demolition in 1966 it was saved and moved to a site in Concord's Historic District. The house has been restored and many of the furnishings either belonged to Pierce or other members of his family. A historic preservation group, The Brigade owns the house and maintains it as a memorial to New Hampshire's only President. The Gravesite at Old North Cemetery in Concord was refurbished and the deteriorating markers were replaced by a single granite spire with all the names inscribed. The first child was buried elsewhere at the time of death. (bio by: Donald Greyfield
    Person ID I150490  MRP Tree
    Last Modified 29 Sep 2014 

    Father Benjamin Pierce,   b. 12 Dec 1756, Chelmsford, Middlesex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Apr 1839, Hillsborough, Hillsborough, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Mother Anna Kendrick,   b. 30 Oct 1768, Amherst, Hillsborough, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Dec 1838, Hillsboro, Hillsborough, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Family ID F41680  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Jane Means Appleton,   b. 1806, Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Dec 1863, Amherst, Hillsborough, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)  [3
    Married 19 Nov 1834  Amherst, Hillsborough, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Franklin Pierce, Jr,   b. 2 Feb 1836, Hillsborough, Hillsborough, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Feb 1836, Hillsborough, Hillsborough, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     2. Frank Robert Pierce,   b. 27 Aug 1839, Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Nov 1843, Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 4 years)
     3. Benjamin Franklin "Benny" Pierce,   b. 13 Apr 1841, Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jan 1853, Andover, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 11 years)
    Last Modified 11 Mar 2014 23:15:24 
    Family ID F34954  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 19 Nov 1834 - Amherst, Hillsborough, New Hampshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - President of the United States - 1853 - 1857 - The White House, Washington, District of Columbia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1853 - 1857 - The White House, Washington, District of Columbia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1860 - Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 8 Oct 1869 - Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Old North Cemetery, Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Pierce, Franklin
    Pierce, Franklin
    Franklin Pierce - 14th United States President
    Pierce, Franklin
    Pierce, Franklin
    Franklin Pierce - 14th United States President
    President Franklin Pierce
    President Franklin Pierce
    Franklin Pierce

    Franklin Pierce became President at a time of apparent tranquility. The United States, by virtue of the Compromise of 1850, seemed to have weathered its sectional storm. By pursuing the recommendations of southern advisers, Pierce--a New Englander--hoped to prevent still another outbreak of that storm. But his policies, far from preserving calm, hastened the disruption of the Union.

    Born in Hillsborough, New Hampshire, in 1804, Pierce attended Bowdoin College. After graduation he studied law, then entered politics. At 24 he was elected to the New Hampshire legislature; two years later he became its Speaker. During the 1830's he went to Washington, first as a Representative, then as a Senator.

    Pierce, after serving in the Mexican War, was proposed by New Hampshire friends for the Presidential nomination in 1852. At the Democratic Convention, the delegates agreed easily enough upon a platform pledging undeviating support of the Compromise of 1850 and hostility to any efforts to agitate the slavery question. But they balloted 48 times and eliminated all the well-known candidates before nominating Pierce, a true "dark horse."

    Probably because the Democrats stood more firmly for the Compromise than the Whigs, and because Whig candidate Gen. Winfield Scott was suspect in the South, Pierce won with a narrow margin of popular votes.

    Two months before he took office, he and his wife saw their eleven-year-old son killed when their train was wrecked. Grief-stricken, Pierce entered the Presidency nervously exhausted.

    In his Inaugural he proclaimed an era of peace and prosperity at home, and vigor in relations with other nations. The United States might have to acquire additional possessions for the sake of its own security, he pointed out, and would not be deterred by "any timid forebodings of evil."

    Pierce had only to make gestures toward expansion to excite the wrath of northerners, who accused him of acting as a cat's-paw of Southerners eager to extend slavery into other areas. Therefore he aroused apprehension when he pressured Great Britain to relinquish its special interests along part of the Central American coast, and even more when he tried to persuade Spain to sell Cuba.

    But the most violent renewal of the storm stemmed from the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which repealed the Missouri Compromise and reopened the question of slavery in the West. This measure, the handiwork of Senator Stephen A. Douglas, grew in part out of his desire to promote a railroad from Chicago to California through Nebraska. Already Secretary of War Jefferson Davis, advocate of a southern transcontinental route, had persuaded Pierce to send James Gadsden to Mexico to buy land for a southern railroad. He purchased the area now comprising southern Arizona and part of southern New Mexico for $10,000,000.

    Douglas's proposal, to organize western territories through which a railroad might run, caused extreme trouble. Douglas provided in his bills that the residents of the new territories could decide the slavery question for themselves. The result was a rush into Kansas, as southerners and northerners vied for control of the territory. Shooting broke out, and "bleeding Kansas" became a prelude to the Civil War.

    By the end of his administration, Pierce could claim "a peaceful condition of things in Kansas." But, to his disappointment, the Democrats refused to renominate him, turning to the less controversial Buchanan. Pierce returned to New Hampshire, leaving his successor to face the rising fury of the sectional whirlwind. He died in 1869.

    The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association.
    http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/franklinpierce

    Census
    1850 U.S. Federal Census
    1850 U.S. Federal Census
    Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire; Roll: M432_435; Page: 3A; Image: 12.

  • Sources 
    1. [S9] Family Trees and LDS, This information is obtained from Public and Private Family Trees and Data Collections including but not limited to: LDS, Ancestry, WFT, MyFamily etc., (Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual private or public files. This infomation is not a "Primary Source".), Ancestry Family Trees.
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=0&pid=141786

    2. [S4] 1860 United States Federal Census, Year: 1860; Census Place: Concord Ward 5, Merrimack, New Hampshire; Roll: ; Page: 859; Imag.
      Birth date: abt 1805 Birth place: New Hampshire Residence date: 1860 Residence place: Concord Ward 5, Merrimack, New Hampshire, United States
      http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=1860usfedcenancestry&h=54742166&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt

    3. [S19] U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, Yates Publishing, (Ancestry.com Operations Inc).
      Name: Jane Means Appleton
      Gender: Female
      Birth Year: 1806
      Spouse Name: Franklin Pierce
      Spouse Birth Year: 1804
      Number Pages: 1


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