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76
carlock-reuben-home.jpg
carlock-reuben-home.jpg
Home of Reuben Carlock 
 
77
castledelazouche.jpg
castledelazouche.jpg
Castle De La Zouche 
 
78
Cathedral of San Fernando
Cathedral of San Fernando
Cathedral of San Fernando -

History
The original church of San Fernando was built between 1738 and 1750. The walls of that church today form the sanctuary of the cathedral, which gives rise to its claim as the oldest cathedral in the State of Texas. The church was named for Ferdinand III of Castile, who ruled in the 13th century. The baptismal font, believed to be a gift from Charles III, who became King of Spain from 1759, is the oldest piece of liturgical furnishing in the cathedral. The cathedral was built by settlers from the Canary Islands, for this reason the interior is a picture of the Virgin of Candelaria, the patroness of the Canary Islands.
Main Plaza, Cathedral, and Court House, San Antonio, Texas(postcard, circa 1901-1914)
Burial Tomb of Davy Crockett, William B. Travis, and Jim Bowie.

In 1831, Jim Bowie married Ursula de Veramendi in San Fernando.

In 1836, the cathedral, still a parish church, played a role in the Battle of the Alamo when Mexican General Antonio López de Santa Anna hoisted a flag of "no quarter" from the church's tower, marking the beginning of the siege.[3]

In 1868, under the director of architect Francois P. Giraud, the cathedral was considerably enlarged in the Gothic style, the addition forming the existing nave. The carved stone Stations of the Cross were added in 1874. The striking stained glass windows were added in 1920.

On September 13, 1987, the cathedral was visited by Pope John Paul II, during the only visit of a pope to Texas. A marble stone marker commemorates the event. 
 
79
cdhighschoolakashinnstonhigh.jpg
cdhighschoolakashinnstonhigh.jpg
Shinnston High School, Shinnston WV 
 
80
Charles Hotel, Shelby NC
Charles Hotel, Shelby NC
Charles Hotel, Shelby NC 
 
81
chesterfield-nj-friends-meeting-house.jpg
chesterfield-nj-friends-meeting-house.jpg
Friends Meeting House, Chesterfield, New Jersey 
 
82
chicago-camp-douglas.jpg
chicago-camp-douglas.jpg
Camp Douglas, Chicago Ill 
 
83
church-standrews-freckenham.jpg
church-standrews-freckenham.jpg
St. Andrews Church, Frenkenham, England 
 
84
City Directory
City Directory
City Directory, 1917 Camden, Camden New Jersey 
 
85
City Directory
City Directory
City Directory, 1917 Camden, Camden New Jersey 
 
86
City Directory
City Directory
City Directory, 1923 Camden, Camden New Jersey 
 
87
City Directory
City Directory
City Directory, 1926 Camden, Camden New Jersey 
 
88
City Directory
City Directory
City Directory, 1927 Camden, Camden New Jersey 
 
89
City Directory
City Directory
City Directory, 1928 Camden, Camden New Jersey 
 
90
City Directory, 1922 Camden, Camden New Jersey
City Directory, 1922 Camden, Camden New Jersey
City Directory, 1922 Camden, Camden New Jersey 
 
91
civil-war.jpg
civil-war.jpg
 
 
92
clark-thomas-home.jpg
clark-thomas-home.jpg
Home of Thomas Goode Clark 
 
93
Coal Train, like the one that killed Jesse
Coal Train, like the one that killed Jesse
Coal Train, like the one that killed Jesse 
 
94
Coat of Arms
Coat of Arms
Coat of arms of Sir William le Boteler 7th Baron of Warrington.
Blazon: Azure a Bend Or, six covered cups of the same. 
 
95
Columbian High School
Columbian High School
Columbian High School 
 
96
Columbus State Hospital for the Insane
Columbus State Hospital for the Insane
Memories of Columbus State Hospital

From Deborah Kovitz Barkat (daughter of Benjamin Kovitz, M.D., clinical director of Columbus State Hospital from the 1940s to 1964).

I definitely have memories of the "Main Building" with beautiful white gingerbread and a wide staircase with shallow steps going up to the main entrance. There were flower beds in front, white iron benches and a green, hilly area where we'd play and my father would set up an easel to paint.

The entrance hall room of the Main Building was my favorite. It had giant square tiles on the floor (darkish red and white) in a checkerboard pattern, diagonal I think, and always full of people, hustle and bustle.

To the left was a big wood and glass display case with things made by patients in the "OT Shop" [occupational therapy shop--Ed.]. I remember loving a certain turquoise felt skirt with sparkly butterflies on it, and I'd look at it every day. Finally my father bought it for me. It turned out to be an apron with a black, satin sash, and I still have it!

At the end of the big entrance hall were two giant glass doors which went into the next section: a continuing hallway where there were offices, including my father's. The floor was different in this part, smaller white hexagon tiles as opposed to the giant squares in the main hall.

There were big, white radiators and lots of big, tall windows. It had a much quieter atmosphere than the exciting main entrance hall.

There were huge, caged elevators with heavy doors. I was scared of them. There was one mean neighborhood kid who would stop the elevator on purpose when I was in it. Terrifying! The elevator went to upper floors where some doctors lived in apartments. One woman doctor from India (Rani Jactiani) lived up there and we liked to visit her. I remember her apartment had very high ceilings and big, tall windows with long, flowing satin or velvet drapes. I think there was some kind of decorative relief work in the plaster walls too, like in a castle.

There was a dark basement, but that may have been in a different building, near the main hospital kitchen. It was long and dark with concrete floors and walls. It was lit with red light bulbs every so often, and there were rats running around.

There were other buildings, also red brick, but not fancy like the Main Building. There were grids [bars--Ed.] on the windows, but we made friends with some of the patients there. The "Clark Bar Man" used to drop us Clark Bars through the window grids.

There were so many things going on there... like a carpenter shop. The "Handsome Carpenter" (probably a high-functioning patient) built us a great dollhouse. We would walk to the "quarry" where there was a huge rockpile where we'd hunt for fossils.

A big, friendly guy, Rufus Lindsey (I can still see his smile) would come over to pick up laundry to take to the hospital laundry. I'm sure he was a patient too. He always wore bluejean overalls. When we left the hospital to move to another part of Columbus, it was so traumatic. It took a long time to get over it.

I still dream about the house we lived in. There was an old rocking-chair left from the time the house was built (1800's?). My mother asked the hospital for permission to keep it when we moved. She gave it to me recently, so I really treasure it. The house was white wood with a front porch and hanging swing. There was another similar white house next door. The rest of the doctors' houses were red brick, duplex-type buildings.
 
 
97
Company_A_23rd_NJ.html
Company_A_23rd_NJ.html
23rd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry

Company "A" 
 
98
Crockett, Davy
Crockett, Davy
A replica of John Crockett's family cabin where David "Davy" Crockett was born, (now the Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park 
 
99
Crockett, Davy
Crockett, Davy
Weathered Stone depicting the birth spot of David Crockett 
 
100
Crockett, Davy
Crockett, Davy
Col. Crockett statue, Lawrenceburg Public Square 
 

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